#Ginology: Aussie In-GIN-unity

 Poor Toms Gin co-owners Jesse and Griff  distilling over 100 different ingredients indivudally. 

Poor Toms Gin co-owners Jesse and Griff  distilling over 100 different ingredients indivudally. 

Once upon a time Aussie gin was merely suckling at the teat of traditional ‘Mother’s Milks’ from their homeland Britain, no longer.

Today, Aussie gin is all grown up, moving out of the nest at Mum's, and getting it’s own pad. Here down under, It’s hard not to think of our nation’s past as you look at gin’s escape from its British heritage. Gin is now flourishing and radically challenging traditional London Dry with some uniquely Aussie craft and small-batch gin.

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Boom Times

Right now, Gin is the largest growing spirit in the country, with dozens of new distilleries popping up across state divides faster than a new scandal in parliament.

 
 Image: Yellow Blogtopus

Image: Yellow Blogtopus

 

These alchemical Aussie gin laboratories have ingeniously begun showcasing our exotic, unique environment, already at high demand across international markets.

 Something must be in the water…


What's in my Gin?

Gin is an exciting, versatile, wheat spirit characterised by its distillation with a wide range of different botanicals and infusions; basically anything goes.

Mixing gin, especially with different interesting garnishes, is the perfect way to incorporate many subtle flavours into a cocktail or other mixed drink. 

 Check out our Ultimate Gin and Tonic Garnish blog.

Check out our Ultimate Gin and Tonic Garnish blog.

The most common style of gin is a London Dry, where most people's minds go when they think of 'Mother’s Ruin' as Nan used to call it.

There are traditionally between 7-12 gin botanicals commonly used to give gins their complex aromas and taste. Some of these include;

 
  •   Juniper berries                        •      Lemon peel
  •   Coriander seeds                      •     Cassia bark
  •   Angelica root                            •     Orange peel
  •   Angelica seed                           •     Orris root
 
 
 Image:  a list of common gin botanicals                Image source: Yellow Blogtopus 

Image:  a list of common gin botanicals                Image source: Yellow Blogtopus 

 

Here’s a blog of our Top 6 Gin Picks that detail which botanicals each uses in their distillation process that feature a load of others and another blog for those of you looking to become real Gin Gurus.


Familiar Flavours

A lot of Aussie things down under are a little different to the rest of the world and that's why we love them. Toilets Dunnies, swimming trunks budgie smugglers, cans of beer emu eggs, not to mention the risque argument on what thongs actually are. Gin is no different.

 
 Periodic Table of Aussie Gin Botanicals by Yellow  .  Click to expand.

Periodic Table of Aussie Gin Botanicals by Yellow . Click to expand.

 

Exactly what defines a gin in Australia has grown to encompass a wider range of flavours, especially as small-batch gins gain notoriety. 

A number of new and experimental producers are acting as perfect examples of good old Aussie in-gin-uity by playing around with unconventional native botanicals which speak to the the distillery’s geography and the distillers. 

The West Winds Gin

 

The West Winds Gins are a local gin distillery based in Margaret River which have taken both domestic and international markets by storm after being the first Aussie gin to take out Double Gold and Gold respectively at the 2011 San Francisco International Spirits Competition.

The dream was manifested by four young Aussies who wanted to create a world-class gin and in the process, got around some incredible native flora as botanical infusions, quickly developing a solid reputation for championing these indigenous flavours.

 
 

Lemon myrtle, wattle seed, Australian bush tomato, cinnamon myrtle and many more unique botanicals are distilled using collected Margaret River rainwater from the region also emphasising a locally shared sense of sustainability amongst the South West.

Learn more about:


Poor Toms Gin

 

Poor Toms Gin is another great example of Aussie in-gin-uity.

They are a new small craft distillery based out of Sydney’s inner western suburbs, dedicated solely to the creation of unconventional world-class gins with a Sydney twist and did exactly that after their Sydney Dry Gin scooped Gold at the San Fran comp last year.

 
 

Poor Tom’s had set out to develop their own Aussie signature recipe the hard way, distilling over 100 unique botanicals one by one to get a sense of each flavour.

The ten they settled on creates a flavour that’s rather sweet and unique.

Adding Strawberry gum, a native gum leaf with the aroma of strawberry, takes this gin to a floral, fresh, fruity delicate flavour profile unlike traditional London dry gins which are usually spicy and citrusy.

This is balanced masterfully through using Aussie Granny Smith apples instead of citrus to stop the more floral flavours being overpowered.

Check out more about our current Spirit of the Month:


G-in Vogue: Latest Trend

Pink is so in right now...

The world has being bombarded again and again by the latest and greatest Rosé trends. First it was those Provencal light pinks, next frosé which was so 2017 . That chilly fad being no good for anything but a brain freeze.

 
 Margot Robbie enjoying a pink gin in the lead up to her Queensland marriage.

Margot Robbie enjoying a pink gin in the lead up to her Queensland marriage.

 

The  new way to show off your pink stuff will be in your next tipple of gin, currently being made famous by celebs such as Margot Robbie.

First created as a stylish cocktail addition by infusing brightly coloured fruits and botanicals, pink gin often contains added grape skin extract to give it that rosey hue.

We always love a good trend at LBHQ especially one centred around rosé or gin even when the primary objective of ordering one at the bar is to accessorise your outfit for Instagram.

 
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We're in exciting times for gin-thusiasts across Australia. An exotic new world of small-batch, craft spirits are here, coupled with a new and exciting spectrum of flavours which will undoubtedly, send our gin industry into boom times.

One thing is for sure. Gin has broken loose here in Australia and there's no signs of putting it back into the bottle... We wouldn't want to anyway.