February 13, 2021

Hendrick’s Gin

The World’s Most Unusual Gin

A Gin Like No Other, Hendrick’s Is Created With A Symphony Of No Less Than 11 Botanicals Sourced From The Four Corners Of The World (If The World Had Corners), Before Being Consummated With The Curious Yet Marvellous Infusions Of Rose And Cucumber.

It is not only the rose and cucumber which makes us unique, Hendrick’s is distilled using not one but two utterly dissimilar types of still. The leaders of this peculiar ensemble is a Bennett, an antique copper pot still dating right back to 1860, and a rare Carter-head from 1948 of which only a handful exist today.

HENDRICK’S GIN is distilled in Girvan, Scotland, drawing on centuries of distilling expertise by independent, family owned distiller, William Grant & Sons, and benefits from the plentiful soft water of the nearby Penwhapple Reservoir.

Each batch of HENDRICK’S GIN is crafted 500 lovely litres at a time in batches at the Hendrick’s Gin Palace, the playground of Master Distiller, Ms Lesley Gracie, creator of this most wonderful elixir.

 

What’s It Like/Tasting Notes

NOSE

  • Intense nose with initial bursts of crisp botanicals
  • Balanced juniper and coriander notes
  • Deep surprisingly floral aroma of roses
  • Sweet orange and lime zest with a hint of elderflower

PALATE

  • Classical hints of angelica, coriander and orris root
  • Superbly balanced botanicals
  • Sweet citrus flavours of orange and lime
  • Hint of yarrow, liquorice and black pepper
  • Subtle finish of soaked rose petals, cucumbers and faint hints of Earl Grey

MOUTHFEEL

  • Singularly smooth
  • Silky texture
  • Thin body

Did You Know/Quick Facts

Hendrick’s master distiller, Lesley Gracie, makes only 500 litres at a time to control production and ensure each bottle is up to her exacting standards.

Lesley Gracie created the recipe, but it was the oldest member of the William Grant family, Janet Sheed Roberts, who named the gin after an expert family gardener named Hendrick. Janet lived to be 110 and was the oldest woman in Scotland of her time.

The dark glass bottle pulls from the aesthetic of Victorian apothecaries, which used to use dark glass to store precious liquids that could be damaged by sunlight.

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